EACC News

FAQs regarding OSHA’s Emergency Temporary Standard for Workplace Vaccination Policies

🇺🇸 English / Anglais
🇫🇷 French / Français

 

On November 4, 2021, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Labor, issued an emergency temporary standard (ETS) that memorializes and formalizes President Biden’s prior directive that all U.S. employers with 100 or more employees must require their workers to be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or submit to weekly COVID-19 testing.

The below FAQs, compliments of Reed Smith, address some of the more salient questions surrounding the ETS.

There are undeniably more questions than answers at present with respect to the ETS. Therefore, before taking any material workplace action with respect to the ETS, please consult with a Reed Smith employment lawyer. The information contained in this article is current as of November 4, 2021. Please note that this is not legal advice. 

Q: To which entities does the ETS apply?

A: Generally speaking, the ETS applies to all U.S. employers that employ 100 or more employees at any time while the ETS is in effect.

Q: Are there any workplaces or employees to which the ETS does not apply?

A: Yes. The ETS does not apply to the following:

  • Employers that, at all times while the ETS is in effect, employ less than 100 U.S. employees
  • Workplaces covered under the Safer Federal Workforce Task Force COVID-19 Workplace Safety: Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors
  • Certain settings where any employee provides health care services or health care support services
  • Employees of covered employers:
  • Who do not report to a workplace where other individuals, such as co-workers or customers, are present
  • While working remotely from home
  • Who work exclusively outdoors Q: Do employees outside the United States count toward the 100-employee threshold?

A: No.

Q: Do employees who work remotely count toward the 100-employee threshold?

A: Yes, remote employees count toward the 100-employee threshold. However, as noted above, employees are not subject to the requirements of the ETS while working remotely from home.

Q: Do part-time employees and/or independent contractors count toward the 100-employee threshold?

A: Part-time employees count toward the threshold, but independent contractors do not.

Q: Is the 100-employee threshold calculated on a per-location basis or is it based on the total number of employees across all U.S. locations?

A: The applicability of this ETS is based on the size of an employer in terms of the total number of U.S. employees rather than on the type or number of workplaces. As OSHA explains, “[i]n determining the number of employees, employers must include all employees across all of their U.S. locations, regardless of employees’ vaccination status or where they perform their work.” An employer with two U.S. locations of 60 employees each (i.e., 120 employees in total), therefore, would be covered by the ETS.

Q: How is the 100-employee threshold calculated for separate but related corporate entities?

A: The ETS itself does not clarify whether separate but related entities that have their own distinct employee headcounts, need to aggregate those headcounts for purposes of the ETS’s 100-employee threshold. OSHA does note, however, that “two or more related entities may be regarded as a single employer for OSH Act purposes if they handle safety matters as one company, in which case the employees of all entities making up the integrated single employer must be counted.”

Having said that, the ETS does provide detailed guidance on this issue for franchisor-franchisee relationships and businesses that utilize temporary staffing agencies, as follows:

In a traditional franchisor-franchisee relationship in which each franchise location is independently owned and operated, the franchisor and franchisees would be separate entities for coverage purposes, such that the franchisor would only count “corporate” employees, and each franchisee would only count employees of that individual franchise.

In scenarios in which employees of a staffing agency are placed at a host employer location, only the staffing agency would count these jointly employed workers for purposes of the 100-employee threshold for coverage under this ETS. Although the staffing agency and the host employer would normally share responsibility for these workers under the OSH Act, this ETS raises unique concerns in that OSHA has set the threshold for coverage based primarily on administrative capacity for purposes of protecting workers as quickly as possible . . . and the staffing agency would typically handle administrative matters for these workers. Thus, for purposes of the 100-employee threshold, only the staffing agency would count the jointly employed employees. The host employer, however, would still be covered by this ETS if it has 100 or more employees in addition to the employees of the staffing agency. For enforcement purposes, traditional joint employer principles would apply where both employers are covered by the ETS. . . . See also https://www.osha.gov/temporaryworkers/.

Q: Does the ETS provide any other examples of how to calculate the 100-employee threshold?

A: Yes. On this point, the ETS first notes that the determination as to whether a particular employer is covered by the standard should be made separately from whether individual employees are covered by the standard’s requirements (e.g., some employers may be covered but have no duties with respect to some of their employees under this standard). Some examples from the ETS include:

  • If an employer has 75 part-time employees and 25 full-time employees, the employer would be within the scope of this ETS because it has 100 employees.
  • If an employer has 150 employees, 100 of whom work from their homes full-time and 50 of whom work in the office at least part of the time, the employer would be within the scope of this ETS because it has more than 100 employees.
  • If an employer has 102 employees and only three ever report to an office location, that employer would be covered.
  • If an employer has 150 employees, and 100 of them perform maintenance work in customers’ homes, primarily working from their company vehicles (i.e., mobile workplaces), and rarely or never report to the main office, that employer would fall within the scope.
  • If an employer has 200 employees, all of whom are vaccinated, that employer would be covered.
  • If an employer has 125 employees, and 115 of them work exclusively outdoors, that employer would be covered.
  • If a single corporation has 50 small locations (e.g., kiosks, concession stands) with at least 100 total employees in its combined locations, that employer would be covered even if some of the locations have no more than one or two employees assigned to work there.
  • If a host employer has 110 permanent employees and 10 temporary employees from a small staffing agency (with fewer than 100 employees of its own), the host employer would be covered under this ETS and the staffing agency would not be covered.
  • If a host employer has 110 permanent employees and 10 employees from a large staffing agency (with more than 100 employees of its own), both the host employer and the staffing agency would be covered under this standard, and traditional joint employer principles would apply.
  • Generally, in a traditional franchisor-franchisee relationship, if the franchisor has more than 100 employees but each individual franchisee has fewer than 100 employees, the franchisor would be covered by this ETS but the individual franchises would not be covered.

Q: What time frame should employers use in calculating the 100-employee threshold?

A: The ETS expressly states that it “covers all employers with a total of 100 or more employees at any time [it] is in effect.” (Emphasis added.) This means that employers who meet this minimum threshold as of the effective date of the ETS are covered throughout the effective time of the ETS, even if the employer later falls under the minimum employee threshold. This also means that employers that fall short of 100 employees as of the ETS’s effective date but reach the threshold at any point that the ETS is in effect would become subject to the ETS requirements as of the date they meet this threshold, and they would remain covered for the duration of the ETS, even if the employer later reduces its workforce to less than 100 employees.

Q: What policy does the ETS require covered employers to adopt?

A: The ETS requires that all covered employers adopt a written workplace vaccination policy. However, it effectively gives employers two different options from which to choose in this regard.

The first option, for which OSHA expresses a clear preference for employers to adopt, is for covered employers to establish, implement, and enforce a written mandatory vaccination policy, which the ETS defines as follows:

An employer policy requiring each employee to be fully vaccinated. To meet this definition, the policy must require: vaccination of all employees, including vaccination of all new employees as soon as practicable, other than those employees

  1. For whom a vaccine is medically contraindicated;
  2. For whom medical necessity requires a delay in vaccination; or
  3. Who are legally entitled to a reasonable accommodation under federal civil rights laws because they have a disability or sincerely held religious beliefs, practices, or observances that conflict with the vaccination requirement.

The second option permits covered employers, in lieu of a mandatory vaccination policy as described above, to instead establish, implement, and enforce a written policy allowing employees to choose to (i) be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 or (ii) provide proof of regular testing for COVID-19 (discussed in more detail below) and wear a face covering in the workplace.

Q: If employers elect to adopt the first option – i.e., a mandatory vaccination policy – can employees request reasonable accommodations with respect to such policy?

A: Yes. Employees may be entitled to reasonable accommodations for disabilities or sincerely held religious beliefs if the employer elects to adopt a mandatory vaccination policy, so long as the accommodation does not impose an undue hardship on the employer. In this regard, the ETS notes that:

Under federal law, including the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, workers may be entitled to a reasonable accommodation from their employer, absent undue hardship. If the worker requesting a reasonable accommodation cannot be vaccinated and/or wear a face covering because of a disability, as defined by the ADA, the worker may be entitled to a reasonable accommodation. In addition, if the vaccination, and/or testing for COVID-19, and/or wearing a face covering conflicts with a worker’s sincerely held religious belief, practice or observance, the worker may be entitled to a reasonable accommodation. For more information about evaluating requests for reasonable accommodation for disability or sincerely held religious belief, employers should consult the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s regulations, guidance, and technical assistance .

Q: If employers elect to adopt the second option – i.e., allowing employees to choose between vaccination and testing what are the specific testing requirements for employees who opt for the testing route?

A: Under these circumstances, the employer must ensure that each employee who is not fully vaccinated complies with one of the following requirements:

  • An employee who reports at least once every seven days to a workplace where other individuals, such as co-workers or customers, are present:
  • Must be tested for COVID-19 at least every seven days
  • Must provide documentation of their most recent COVID-19 test result to the employer by no later than the seventh day following the date on which the employee last provided a test result
  • An employee who does not report during a period of seven or more days to a workplace where other individuals, such as co-workers or customers, are present (e.g., if the employee is working remotely for two weeks prior to reporting to a workplace with others):
  • Must be tested for COVID-19 within seven days prior to returning to the workplace
  • Must provide documentation of that test result to the employer upon return

Q: What does an employer need to do if an employee fails to provide documentation of the COVID-19 test result referenced in the preceding FAQ?

A: If an employee does not provide documentation of a COVID-19 test result as required by the ETS, the employer must keep that employee removed from the workplace until the employee provides a negative test result.

On a related point, the employer must maintain a record of each test result provided by each employee under the ETS. These records “are considered to be employee medical records and must be maintained as [confidential] and must not be disclosed except as required or authorized by this section or other federal law.” Notably, however, these records are not subject to OSHA’s lengthy retention requirements under 29 CFR 1910.1020 of employment plus 30 years.

Q: Do the testing requirements referenced in the two preceding FAQs apply to employees who test positive for COVID19?

A: No. When an employee has received a positive COVID-19 test result, or has been diagnosed with COVID-19 by a licensed healthcare provider, the employer cannot require that employee to undergo COVID-19 testing as required under the ETS for 90 days following the date of their positive test or diagnosis.

Q: Does the ETS require employers to pay for the testing referenced in the three preceding FAQs?

A: No. The ETS does not require employers to pay for any cost associated with testing, but it does caution that “employer payment for testing may be required by other laws, regulations, or collective bargaining agreements or other collectively negotiated agreements.”

Q: I understand that, if employers elect to adopt the approach that allows employees to choose between vaccination and testing, employees who are not fully vaccinated must wear a face covering in the workplace. Are there any exceptions to this?

A: The ETS requires that employers ensure that all employees who are not fully vaccinated wear a face covering when indoors and when occupying a vehicle with another person for work purposes, except under the following circumstances:

  • When an employee is alone in a room with floor to ceiling walls and a closed door.
  • For a limited time while the employee is eating or drinking at the workplace or for identification purposes in compliance with safety and security requirements.
  • When an employee is wearing a respirator or facemask, the latter of which the ETS defines as a “surgical, medical procedure, dental, or isolation mask that is FDA-cleared, authorized by an FDA EUA, or offered or distributed as described in an FDA enforcement policy. Facemasks may also be referred to as ’medical procedure masks.’”
  • Where the employer can show that the use of face coverings is infeasible or creates a greater hazard that would excuse compliance with this paragraph (e.g., when it is important to see the employee’s mouth for reasons related to their job duties, when the work requires the use of the employee’s uncovered mouth, or when the use of a face covering presents a risk of serious injury or death to the employee).

Q: Does the ETS require employers to pay for the face coverings referenced in the preceding FAQ?

A: No. The ETS does not require employers to pay for any cost associated with face covering, but it does caution that “employer payment for face coverings may be required by other laws, regulations, or collective bargaining agreements or other collectively negotiated agreements.”

Q: How do employers determine an employee’s vaccination status for purposes of the ETS?

A: The ETS requires employers to determine the vaccination status of each of their employees, including whether each employee is fully vaccinated. In particular, the ETS provides that “[t]he employer must require each vaccinated employee to provide acceptable proof of vaccination status, including whether they are fully or partially vaccinated.” Acceptable forms of proof include a copy of the COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card and a record of immunization from a health care provider or pharmacy, among other things.

In instances where an employee is unable to produce acceptable proof of vaccination, the employee must submit a signed and dated statement attesting to their vaccination status and other information required by the ETS. An employee who does not submit acceptable proof of vaccination, or the requisite attestation, is to be treated as not fully vaccinated for purposes of the ETS.

Q: Do employers need to maintain a record of their employees’ vaccination status?

A: Yes. The ETS provides that “[t]he employer must maintain a record of each employee’s vaccination status and must preserve acceptable proof of vaccination for each employee who is fully or partially vaccinated. The employer must maintain a roster of each employee’s vaccination status. These records and roster “are considered to be employee medical records and must be maintained as [confidential] and must not be disclosed except as required or authorized by this section or other federal law.” Notably, however, these records are not subject to OSHA’s lengthy retention requirements under 29 CFR 1910.1020 of employment plus 30 years.

Q: What if an employer ascertained an employee’s vaccination status prior to the ETS taking effect? Do we need to ascertain the employee’s vaccination status again?

A: When an employer has ascertained an employee’s vaccination status prior to the effective date of the ETS through another form of attestation or proof, and retained records of that ascertainment, this is sufficient for purposes of the ETS and the employer does not need to ascertain the employee’s vaccination status again.

Q: Do employers need to provide employees with paid time off to get the vaccine?

A: Yes. The ETS requires employers to provide (i) a “reasonable amount of time” to each employee to obtain each of their primary vaccination dose(s) and (ii) up to four hours of paid time, including travel time, at the employee’s regular rate of pay for this purpose.

Q: Do employers need to provide employees with paid time off to recover from side effects experienced following receipt of a dose of the vaccine?

A: Yes. The ETS requires employers to provide “reasonable time and paid sick leave” to recover from any side effects experienced following receipt of a dose of the vaccine.

Q: Does the ETS impose any notice requirements on employers?

A: Yes. The ETS requires that employers inform their employees, in a language and at a literacy level the employees understand, about:

  • The requirements of the ETS as well as any employer policies and procedures established to implement the ETS;
  • COVID-19 vaccine efficacy, safety, and the benefits of being vaccinated, by providing the document, “Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines” (available at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/keythingstoknow.html).
  • The requirements of 29 CFR 1904.35(b)(1)(iv), which prohibits the employer from discharging or in any manner discriminating against an employee for reporting a work-related injury or illness, and section 11(c) of the OSH Act, which prohibits the employer from discriminating against an employee for exercising rights under, or as a result of actions that are required by, this section. Section 11(c) also protects the employee from retaliation for filing an occupational safety or health complaint, reporting a work-related injury or illness, or otherwise exercising any rights afforded by the OSH Act.
  • The prohibitions of 18 U.S.C. 1001 and of section 17(g) of the OSH Act, which provide for criminal penalties associated with knowingly supplying false statements or documentation.

Q: Does the ETS impose any notice requirements on employees?

A: Yes. The ETS provides that, regardless of COVID-19 vaccination status or any COVID-19 testing required under the ETS, all covered employees must promptly notify the employer when they receive a positive COVID-19 test or are diagnosed with COVID-19 by a licensed healthcare provider.

Q: What should an employer do if an employee provides notice of a positive COVID-19 test or diagnosis?

A: The ETS provides that employers must immediately remove from the workplace any employee who receives a positive COVID-19 test or is diagnosed with COVID-19 by a licensed healthcare provider and keep the employee removed until the employee:

  • Receives a negative result on a COVID-19 nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) following a positive result on a COVID-19 antigen test if the employee chooses to seek a NAAT test for confirmatory testing
  • Meets the return to work criteria in CDC’s “Isolation Guidance”
  • Receives a recommendation to return to work from a licensed healthcare provider

Notably, however, the ETS does not require employers to provide paid time to any employee for removal as a result of a positive COVID-19 test or diagnosis of COVID-19 (although paid time may be required by other laws, regulations, or collective bargaining agreements or other collectively negotiated agreements).

Q: Does the ETS impose any reporting requirements on employers?

A: Yes. Under the ETS, employers must report to OSHA (i) each work-related COVID-19 fatality within eight hours of the employer learning about the fatality and (ii) each work-related COVID-19 in-patient hospitalization within 24 hours of the employer learning about the in-patient hospitalization.

Q: Does the ETS preempt inconsistent state and/or local requirements?

A: Yes. The ETS expressly states that it “preempt[s] inconsistent state and local requirements relating to these issues, including requirements that ban or limit employers’ authority to require vaccination, face covering, or testing, regardless of the number of employees.” Based on the background information provided throughout the ETS, OSHA clearly intends for courts to interpret this language quite broadly – i.e., in favor of preemption – if and when a legal preemption challenge is raised.

Q: Does the ETS supplant collective bargaining agreements?

A: No. The ETS expressly states that it “does not supplant collective bargaining agreements or other collectively negotiated agreements in effect that may have negotiated terms that exceed the requirements herein.”

  • Q: Does the ETS apply to federal contractors who are required to adopt a mandatory vaccination policy under President Biden’s other recent executive order?

A: No, in most cases. The ETS explains that:

Under paragraph (b)(2)(i), this ETS does not apply to workplaces covered by the Safer Federal Workforce Task Force COVID-19 Workplace Safety: Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors (see Safer Federal Workforce Task Force, September 24, 2021). With limited exceptions, such as where a medical contraindication, disability, or sincerely held religious belief would prevent an employee from complying with certain provisions, those guidelines require covered contractors to ensure that all covered contractor employees (1) are fully vaccinated by December 8, 2021; (2) follow CDC guidelines for masks and physical distancing, including masking and distancing requirements based on the employee’s vaccination status and the level of community transmission of COVID-19 where the workplace is located; and (3) designate a person to coordinate COVID-19 workplace safety efforts at covered workplaces. Because covered contractor employees are already covered by the protections in those guidelines, OSHA has determined that complying with this standard in addition to the federal contractor guidelines is not necessary to protect covered contractor employees from a grave danger posed by COVID-19.

Q: When are employees considered fully vaccinated for purposes of the ETS?

A: Generally speaking, two weeks after receiving the lone dose of a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine or the second dose of a two-dose COVID-19 vaccine. The ETS also notes that, for an employee to be considered fully vaccinated, the second dose of any two-dose COVID-19 vaccine series must be received by the employee at least 17 days (21 days with a four-day grace period) after the first dose.

Q: Can employers adopt policies that exceed the minimum requirements set by the ETS?

A: Yes.

Q: What is the deadline for compliance with the ETS?

A: U.S. employers who are covered by the ETS must comply by December 5, 2021, except with respect to the testing requirements. The deadline for compliance with the testing requirements for employees who are not fully vaccinated is January 4, 2022.

Q: For how long will the ETS remain in effect?

A: Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act), an ETS serves as a proposal for a permanent standard, and the Act calls for the permanent standard to be finalized within six months after publication of the ETS.

Key contacts : 

Mark S. Goldstein, Partner, New York – mgoldstein@reedsmith.com
Emily P. Harbison, Partner, Houston – eharbison@reedsmith.com
James A. Holt, Counsel, Pittsburgh – jholt@reedsmith.com
John McDonald, Partner, Princeton – jmcdonald@reedsmith.com
Benjamin H. Patton, Partner, Houston – bpatton@reedsmith.com

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Le 4 novembre 2021, l’Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) des États-Unis, une agence du département américain du Travail, a publié une norme temporaire d’urgence (ETS) qui commémore et officialise la directive préalable du président Biden selon laquelle tous les employeurs américains comptant 100 employés ou plus les employés doivent exiger que leurs travailleurs soient entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19 ou se soumettent à des tests COVID-19 hebdomadaires.

Les FAQ ci-dessous, compliments de Reed Smith, répondent à certaines des questions les plus importantes concernant l’ETS.

Il y a indéniablement plus de questions que de réponses à l’heure actuelle concernant l’ETS. Par conséquent, avant d’entreprendre toute action importante sur le lieu de travail concernant l’ETS, veuillez consulter un avocat spécialisé en droit du travail de Reed Smith. Les informations contenues dans cet article sont à jour au 4 novembre 2021. Veuillez noter qu’il ne s’agit pas d’un avis juridique.

Q : À quelles entités l’ETS s’applique-t-il ?

R : De manière générale, l’ETS s’applique à tous les employeurs américains qui emploient 100 employés ou plus à tout moment pendant que l’ETS est en vigueur.

Q : Y a-t-il des lieux de travail ou des employés auxquels l’ETS ne s’applique pas ?

R : Oui. L’ETS ne s’applique pas aux éléments suivants :

  • Les employeurs qui, à tout moment pendant que l’ETS est en vigueur, emploient moins de 100 employés américains
  • Lieux de travail couverts par le Safer Federal Workforce Task Force COVID-19 Workplace Safety: Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors
  • Certains contextes où un employé fournit des services de soins de santé ou des services de soutien aux soins de santé
  • Salariés d’employeurs couverts :
  • Qui ne se présentent pas à un lieu de travail où d’autres personnes, telles que des collègues ou des clients, sont présentes
  • En travaillant à distance depuis chez soi
  • Qui travaillent exclusivement à l’extérieur

Q : Les employés en dehors des États-Unis sont-ils pris en compte dans le calcul du seuil de 100 employés ?

R : Non.

Q : Les employés qui travaillent à distance comptent-ils pour le seuil de 100 employés ?

R : Oui, les employés distants comptent pour le seuil de 100 employés. Cependant, comme indiqué ci-dessus, les employés ne sont pas soumis aux exigences de l’ETS lorsqu’ils travaillent à distance depuis leur domicile.

Q : Les employés à temps partiel et/ou les entrepreneurs indépendants comptent-ils pour le seuil de 100 employés ?

R : Les employés à temps partiel comptent pour le seuil, mais pas les entrepreneurs indépendants.

Q : Le seuil de 100 employés est-il calculé par emplacement ou est-il basé sur le nombre total d’employés dans tous les emplacements aux États-Unis ?

R : L’applicabilité de cet ETS est basée sur la taille d’un employeur en termes de nombre total d’employés américains plutôt que sur le type ou le nombre de lieux de travail. Comme l’explique l’OSHA, “[d]ans la détermination du nombre d’employés, les employeurs doivent inclure tous les employés de tous leurs sites aux États-Unis, quel que soit le statut vaccinal des employés ou l’endroit où ils effectuent leur travail”. Un employeur avec deux sites américains de 60 employés chacun (c’est-à-dire 120 employés au total) serait donc couvert par l’ETS.

Q : Comment le seuil de 100 employés est-il calculé pour les personnes morales distinctes mais liées ?

R : L’ETS lui-même ne précise pas si des entités distinctes mais liées qui ont leurs propres effectifs d’employés distincts doivent agréger ces effectifs aux fins du seuil de 100 employés de l’ETS. L’OSHA note cependant que “deux ou plusieurs entités liées peuvent être considérées comme un employeur unique aux fins de la loi SST si elles traitent les questions de sécurité comme une seule entreprise, auquel cas les employés de toutes les entités constituant l’employeur unique intégré doivent être comptés”. .”

Cela dit, l’ETS fournit des conseils détaillés sur cette question pour les relations franchiseur-franchisé et les entreprises qui utilisent des agences de placement temporaire, comme suit :

Dans une relation franchiseur-franchisé traditionnelle dans laquelle chaque franchise est détenue et exploitée de manière indépendante, le franchiseur et les franchisés seraient des entités distinctes à des fins de couverture, de sorte que le franchiseur ne compterait que les employés « corporatifs », et chaque franchisé ne compterait que les employés de cette franchise individuelle.

Dans les scénarios dans lesquels les employés d’une agence de placement sont placés chez un employeur hôte, seule l’agence de placement compterait ces travailleurs employés conjointement aux fins du seuil de 100 employés pour la couverture en vertu de la présente STE. Bien que l’agence de placement et l’employeur d’accueil partagent normalement la responsabilité de ces travailleurs en vertu de la loi SST, cette STE soulève des préoccupations particulières dans la mesure où l’OSHA a fixé le seuil de couverture en fonction principalement de la capacité administrative afin de protéger les travailleurs le plus rapidement possible . . . et l’agence de placement s’occuperait généralement des questions administratives pour ces travailleurs. Ainsi, aux fins du seuil de 100 employés, seule l’agence de placement compterait les employés employés conjointement. L’employeur d’accueil serait toutefois toujours couvert par cette ETS s’il compte 100 salariés ou plus en plus des salariés de l’agence de placement. À des fins d’exécution, les principes traditionnels de l’employeur conjoint s’appliqueraient lorsque les deux employeurs sont couverts par l’ETS. . . . Voir aussi https://www.osha.gov/temporaryworkers/.

Q : L’ETS fournit-il d’autres exemples de calcul du seuil de 100 employés ?

R : Oui. Sur ce point, l’ETS note tout d’abord que la détermination quant à savoir si un employeur particulier est couvert par la norme doit être faite séparément de la question de savoir si des employés individuels sont couverts par les exigences de la norme (par exemple, certains employeurs peuvent être couverts mais n’ont aucune obligation à l’égard à certains de leurs employés en vertu de cette norme). Voici quelques exemples de l’ETS :

  • Si un employeur compte 75 salariés à temps partiel et 25 salariés à temps plein, l’employeur entre dans le champ d’application de cette ETS car il compte 100 salariés.
  • Si un employeur emploie 150 salariés, dont 100 travaillent depuis leur domicile à temps plein et 50 travaillent au bureau au moins une partie du temps, l’employeur entrerait dans le champ d’application de cet ETS car il compte plus de 100 salariés.
  • Si un employeur compte 102 employés et que seulement trois se présentent à un bureau, cet employeur serait couvert.
  • Si un employeur compte 150 employés et que 100 d’entre eux effectuent des travaux d’entretien au domicile des clients, travaillant principalement à partir de leurs véhicules de société (c’est-à-dire des lieux de travail mobiles) et se présentent rarement ou jamais au siège social, cet employeur entrerait dans le champ d’application.
  • Si un employeur a 200 employés, qui sont tous vaccinés, cet employeur serait couvert.
  • Si un employeur compte 125 employés et que 115 d’entre eux travaillent exclusivement à l’extérieur, cet employeur serait couvert.
  • Si une seule société a 50 petits emplacements (par exemple, des kiosques, des stands de concession) avec au moins 100 employés au total dans ses emplacements combinés, cet employeur serait couvert même si certains des emplacements n’ont pas plus d’un ou deux employés affectés à y travailler .
  • Si un employeur d’accueil a 110 employés permanents et 10 employés temporaires d’une petite agence de placement (avec moins de 100 employés), l’employeur d’accueil serait couvert par cette ETS et l’agence de placement ne serait pas couverte.
  • Si un employeur d’accueil compte 110 employés permanents et 10 employés d’une grande agence de placement (avec plus de 100 employés), l’employeur d’accueil et l’agence de placement seraient couverts par cette norme, et les principes traditionnels de l’employeur conjoint s’appliqueraient.
  • Généralement, dans une relation franchiseur-franchisé traditionnelle, si le franchiseur a plus de 100 employés mais que chaque franchisé individuel a moins de 100 employés, le franchiseur serait couvert par cet ETS mais les franchises individuelles ne seraient pas couvertes.

Q : Quel délai les employeurs doivent-ils utiliser pour calculer le seuil de 100 employés ?

R : L’ETS stipule expressément qu’il « couvre tous les employeurs ayant un total de 100 employés ou plus à tout moment [qu’il] est en vigueur ». (C’est nous qui soulignons.) Cela signifie que les employeurs qui atteignent ce seuil minimum à la date d’entrée en vigueur de l’ETS sont couverts pendant toute la durée d’entrée en vigueur de l’ETS, même si l’employeur tombe plus tard sous le seuil minimum d’employés. Cela signifie également que les employeurs qui manquent de 100 employés à la date d’entrée en vigueur de l’ETS mais qui atteignent le seuil à tout moment où l’ETS est en vigueur deviendraient assujettis aux exigences de l’ETS à compter de la date à laquelle ils atteindraient ce seuil, et ils resteraient couverts pendant toute la durée de l’ETS, même si l’employeur réduit ultérieurement ses effectifs à moins de 100 salariés.

Q : Quelle politique l’ETS exige-t-il que les employeurs couverts adoptent ?

R : L’ETS exige que tous les employeurs couverts adoptent une politique écrite de vaccination sur le lieu de travail. Cependant, cela donne effectivement aux employeurs deux options différentes parmi lesquelles choisir à cet égard.

La première option, pour laquelle l’OSHA exprime une nette préférence pour les employeurs, est que les employeurs couverts établissent, mettent en œuvre et appliquent une politique écrite de vaccination obligatoire, que l’ETS définit comme suit :

Une politique de l’employeur exigeant que chaque employé soit entièrement vacciné. Pour répondre à cette définition, la politique doit exiger : la vaccination de tous les employés, y compris la vaccination de tous les nouveaux employés dès que possible, autres que les employés

  1. Pour qui un vaccin est médicalement contre-indiqué ;
  2. Pour qui la nécessité médicale impose un délai de vaccination ; ou alors
  3. Qui ont légalement droit à un aménagement raisonnable en vertu des lois fédérales sur les droits civils parce qu’ils ont un handicap ou des croyances, pratiques ou observances religieuses sincères qui entrent en conflit avec l’exigence de vaccination.

La deuxième option permet aux employeurs couverts, au lieu d’une politique de vaccination obligatoire telle que décrite ci-dessus, d’établir, de mettre en œuvre et d’appliquer une politique écrite permettant aux employés de choisir (i) d’être entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19 ou (ii) de fournir une preuve de dépistage régulier de la COVID-19 (discuté plus en détail ci-dessous) et porter un couvre-visage sur le lieu de travail.

Q : Si les employeurs choisissent d’adopter la première option – c’est-à-dire une politique de vaccination obligatoire – les employés peuvent-ils demander des aménagements raisonnables concernant cette politique ?

R : Oui. Les employés peuvent avoir droit à des aménagements raisonnables en cas de handicap ou de croyances religieuses sincères si l’employeur choisit d’adopter une politique de vaccination obligatoire, à condition que l’aménagement n’impose pas de contrainte excessive à l’employeur. A cet égard, l’ETS note que :

En vertu de la loi fédérale, y compris l’Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) et le titre VII de la loi sur les droits civils de 1964, les travailleurs peuvent avoir droit à un aménagement raisonnable de la part de leur employeur, en l’absence de difficultés excessives. Si le travailleur qui demande un aménagement raisonnable ne peut pas être vacciné et/ou porter un couvre-visage en raison d’un handicap, tel que défini par l’ADA, le travailleur peut avoir droit à un aménagement raisonnable. De plus, si la vaccination et/ou le dépistage de la COVID-19 et/ou le port d’un couvre-visage entrent en conflit avec les croyances, pratiques ou observances religieuses sincères d’un travailleur, le travailleur peut avoir droit à un aménagement raisonnable. Pour plus d’informations sur l’évaluation des demandes d’aménagement raisonnable en cas de handicap ou de croyance religieuse sincère, les employeurs doivent consulter les réglementations, les conseils et l’assistance technique de la Commission pour l’égalité des chances en matière d’emploi .

Q : Si les employeurs choisissent d’adopter la deuxième option – c’est-à-dire permettre aux employés de choisir entre la vaccination et le test, quelles sont les exigences spécifiques en matière de test pour les employés qui optent pour la voie du test ?

R : Dans ces circonstances, l’employeur doit s’assurer que chaque employé qui n’est pas complètement vacciné respecte l’une des exigences suivantes :

Un employé qui se présente au moins une fois tous les sept jours à un lieu de travail où d’autres personnes, comme des collègues ou des clients, sont présents :

  • Doit être testé pour COVID-19 au moins tous les sept jours
  • Doit fournir à l’employeur la documentation de son résultat de test COVID-19 le plus récent au plus tard le septième jour suivant la date à laquelle l’employé a fourni un résultat de test pour la dernière fois
  • Un employé qui ne se présente pas pendant une période de sept jours ou plus à un lieu de travail où d’autres personnes, telles que des collègues ou des clients, sont présents (par exemple, si l’employé travaille à distance pendant deux semaines avant de se présenter à un lieu de travail avec autres):
  • Doit être testé pour le COVID-19 dans les sept jours avant de retourner au travail
  • Doit fournir la documentation de ce résultat de test à l’employeur à son retour

Q : Que doit faire un employeur si un employé ne fournit pas la documentation du résultat du test COVID-19 mentionné dans la FAQ précédente ?

R : Si un employé ne fournit pas la documentation d’un résultat de test COVID-19 comme l’exige l’ETS, l’employeur doit garder cet employé éloigné du lieu de travail jusqu’à ce que l’employé fournisse un résultat de test négatif.

Sur un point connexe, l’employeur doit tenir un registre de chaque résultat de test fourni par chaque employé dans le cadre de l’ETS. Ces dossiers “sont considérés comme des dossiers médicaux des employés et doivent être conservés comme [confidentiels] et ne doivent pas être divulgués, sauf si cela est requis ou autorisé par le présent article ou une autre loi fédérale”. Notamment, cependant, ces dossiers ne sont pas soumis aux longues exigences de conservation de l’OSHA en vertu de 29 CFR 1910.1020 d’emploi plus 30 ans.

Q : Les exigences de test référencées dans les deux FAQ précédentes s’appliquent-elles aux employés dont le test COVID19 est positif ?

R : Non. Lorsqu’un employé a reçu un résultat positif au test COVID-19 ou a reçu un diagnostic de COVID-19 par un fournisseur de soins de santé agréé, l’employeur ne peut pas exiger que cet employé subisse un test COVID-19 comme l’exige l’ETS pendant 90 heures. jours suivant la date de leur test ou diagnostic positif.

Q : L’ETS oblige-t-il les employeurs à payer pour les tests référencés dans les trois FAQ précédentes ?

R : Non. L’ETS n’oblige pas les employeurs à payer les coûts associés aux tests, mais elle avertit que “le paiement par l’employeur pour les tests peut être exigé par d’autres lois, réglementations, conventions collectives ou autres accords négociés collectivement”.

Q : Je comprends que si les employeurs choisissent d’adopter l’approche qui permet aux employés de choisir entre la vaccination et le test, les employés qui ne sont pas complètement vaccinés doivent porter un couvre-visage sur le lieu de travail. Y a-t-il des exceptions à cela ?

R : L’ETS exige que les employeurs s’assurent que tous les employés qui ne sont pas complètement vaccinés portent un couvre-visage lorsqu’ils sont à l’intérieur et lorsqu’ils occupent un véhicule avec une autre personne à des fins de travail, sauf dans les circonstances suivantes :

  • Lorsqu’un employé est seul dans une pièce avec des murs du sol au plafond et une porte fermée.
  • Pendant un temps limité pendant que l’employé mange ou boit sur le lieu de travail ou à des fins d’identification conformément aux exigences de sécurité et de sûreté.
  • Lorsqu’un employé porte un respirateur ou un masque facial, ce dernier étant défini par l’ETS comme un “masque chirurgical, de procédure médicale, dentaire ou d’isolement qui est autorisé par la FDA, autorisé par un EUA de la FDA, ou offert ou distribué comme décrit dans un Politique d’application de la FDA. Les masques faciaux peuvent également être appelés «masques de procédure médicale».
  • Lorsque l’employeur peut démontrer que l’utilisation de couvre-visage est irréalisable ou crée un plus grand danger qui justifierait le respect de ce paragraphe (par exemple, lorsqu’il est important de voir la bouche de l’employé pour des raisons liées à ses fonctions, lorsque le travail exige la l’utilisation de la bouche découverte du salarié ou lorsque l’utilisation d’un couvre-visage présente un risque de blessure grave ou de mort pour le salarié).

Q : L’ETS oblige-t-il les employeurs à payer pour les couvre-visages mentionnés dans la FAQ précédente ?

R : Non. L’ETS n’oblige pas les employeurs à payer les coûts associés au couvre-visage, mais il avertit que « le paiement par l’employeur pour les couvre-visages peut être exigé par d’autres lois, réglementations, conventions collectives ou autres accords négociés collectivement. ”

Q : Comment les employeurs déterminent-ils le statut vaccinal d’un employé aux fins de l’ETS ?

R : L’ETS exige que les employeurs déterminent le statut vaccinal de chacun de leurs employés, y compris si chaque employé est entièrement vacciné. En particulier, l’ETS prévoit que “[l]’employeur doit exiger de chaque employé vacciné qu’il fournisse une preuve acceptable de son statut vaccinal, y compris s’il est entièrement ou partiellement vacciné”. Les formes de preuve acceptables comprennent une copie de la carte de vaccination COVID-19 et un dossier d’immunisation d’un fournisseur de soins de santé ou d’une pharmacie, entre autres.

Dans les cas où un employé n’est pas en mesure de produire une preuve acceptable de vaccination, l’employé doit soumettre une déclaration signée et datée attestant de son statut vaccinal et d’autres informations requises par l’ETS. Un employé qui ne présente pas une preuve acceptable de vaccination, ou l’attestation requise, doit être traité comme n’étant pas complètement vacciné aux fins de l’ETS.

Q : Les employeurs doivent-ils tenir un registre du statut vaccinal de leurs employés ?

R : Oui. L’ETS prévoit que “[l]’employeur doit tenir un registre du statut vaccinal de chaque employé et doit conserver une preuve de vaccination acceptable pour chaque employé qui est entièrement ou partiellement vacciné. L’employeur doit tenir une liste du statut vaccinal de chaque employé. Ces dossiers et cette liste “sont considérés comme des dossiers médicaux des employés et doivent être conservés comme [confidentiels] et ne doivent pas être divulgués, sauf si cela est requis ou autorisé par le présent article ou une autre loi fédérale”. Notamment, cependant, ces dossiers ne sont pas soumis aux longues exigences de conservation de l’OSHA en vertu de 29 CFR 1910.1020 d’emploi plus 30 ans.

Q : Que se passe-t-il si un employeur a vérifié le statut vaccinal d’un employé avant l’entrée en vigueur de l’ETS ? Devons-nous vérifier à nouveau le statut vaccinal de l’employé ?

R : Lorsqu’un employeur a vérifié le statut vaccinal d’un employé avant la date d’entrée en vigueur de l’ETS au moyen d’une autre forme d’attestation ou de preuve, et a conservé des enregistrements de cette vérification, cela est suffisant aux fins de l’ETS et l’employeur n’a pas besoin de s’assurer à nouveau le statut vaccinal de l’employé.

Q : Les employeurs doivent-ils accorder aux employés des congés payés pour se faire vacciner ?

R : Oui. L’ETS exige que les employeurs accordent (i) un « délai raisonnable » à chaque employé pour obtenir chacune de ses doses de primo-vaccination et (ii) jusqu’à quatre heures de temps rémunéré, y compris le temps de déplacement, au lieu de travail habituel de l’employé. taux de rémunération à cet effet.

Q : Les employeurs doivent-ils accorder aux employés des congés payés pour se remettre des effets secondaires ressentis après avoir reçu une dose de vaccin ?

R : Oui. L’ETS exige des employeurs qu’ils accordent « un délai raisonnable et des congés de maladie payés » pour se remettre de tout effet secondaire ressenti après la réception d’une dose de vaccin.

Q : L’ETS impose-t-il des exigences de préavis aux employeurs ?

R : Oui. L’ETS exige que les employeurs informent leurs employés, dans une langue et à un niveau d’alphabétisation que les employés comprennent, sur :

Les exigences de l’ETS ainsi que toutes les politiques et procédures de l’employeur établies pour mettre en œuvre l’ETS ;
Efficacité, sécurité et avantages du vaccin contre la COVID-19, en fournissant le document « Key Things to Know About COVID-19 Vaccines » (disponible sur https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/ vaccins/keythingstoknow.html).
Les exigences du 29 CFR 1904.35(b)(1)(iv), qui interdit à l’employeur de licencier ou de discriminer de quelque manière que ce soit un employé pour avoir signalé une blessure ou une maladie liée au travail, et l’article 11(c) de la loi SST , qui interdit à l’employeur de faire preuve de discrimination à l’encontre d’un employé pour l’exercice de ses droits en vertu du présent article ou à la suite d’actions requises par celui-ci. L’article 11 (c) protège également l’employé contre les représailles pour avoir déposé une plainte en matière de sécurité ou de santé au travail, signalé une blessure ou une maladie liée au travail ou exercé de toute autre manière les droits accordés par la loi SST.
Les interdictions de 18 U.S.C. 1001 et de l’article 17(g) de la loi SST, qui prévoient des sanctions pénales associées à la fourniture sciemment de fausses déclarations ou de faux documents.

Q : L’ETS impose-t-il des préavis aux employés ?

R : Oui. L’ETS prévoit que, quel que soit le statut de vaccination COVID-19 ou tout test COVID-19 requis en vertu de l’ETS, tous les employés couverts doivent informer rapidement l’employeur lorsqu’ils reçoivent un test COVID-19 positif ou reçoivent un diagnostic de COVID-19 par un médecin agréé. fournisseur de soins de santé.

Q : Que doit faire un employeur si un employé l’avise d’un test ou d’un diagnostic positif à la COVID-19 ?

R : L’ETS prévoit que les employeurs doivent immédiatement retirer du lieu de travail tout employé qui reçoit un test COVID-19 positif ou qui reçoit un diagnostic de COVID-19 par un fournisseur de soins de santé agréé et garder l’employé éloigné jusqu’à ce que l’employé :

Reçoit un résultat négatif sur un test d’amplification d’acide nucléique COVID-19 (TAAN) suite à un résultat positif sur un test d’antigène COVID-19 si l’employé choisit de demander un test TAAN pour un test de confirmation
Répond aux critères de retour au travail des «Conseils d’isolement» du CDC
Reçoit une recommandation de retour au travail d’un fournisseur de soins de santé agréé
Notamment, cependant, l’ETS n’oblige pas les employeurs à accorder du temps rémunéré à tout employé pour le retrait à la suite d’un test COVID-19 positif ou d’un diagnostic de COVID-19 (bien que du temps rémunéré puisse être exigé par d’autres lois, réglementations ou conventions collectives). conventions collectives ou autres accords négociés collectivement).

Q : L’ETS impose-t-il des exigences de déclaration aux employeurs ?

R : Oui. Dans le cadre de l’ETS, les employeurs doivent signaler à l’OSHA (i) chaque décès lié au travail lié au COVID-19 dans les huit heures après que l’employeur a appris le décès et (ii) chaque hospitalisation liée au travail liée au COVID-19 dans les 24 heures suivant le décès. l’employeur se renseigne sur l’hospitalisation en milieu hospitalier.

Q : L’ETS prévient-il les exigences nationales et/ou locales incohérentes ?

R : Oui. L’ETS déclare expressément qu’il “prévient les exigences nationales et locales incohérentes relatives à ces questions, y compris les exigences qui interdisent ou limitent le pouvoir des employeurs d’exiger la vaccination, le port du masque ou des tests, quel que soit le nombre d’employés”. Sur la base des informations de base fournies tout au long de l’ETS, l’OSHA a clairement l’intention que les tribunaux interprètent ce langage de manière assez large – c’est-à-dire en faveur de la préemption – si et quand une contestation légale de la préemption est soulevée.

Q : L’ETS remplace-t-il les conventions collectives ?

R : Non. L’ETS stipule expressément qu’elle « ne remplace pas les conventions collectives ou autres accords négociés collectivement en vigueur qui peuvent avoir des conditions négociées qui dépassent les exigences des présentes ».

Q : L’ETS s’applique-t-il aux entrepreneurs fédéraux qui sont tenus d’adopter une politique de vaccination obligatoire en vertu de l’autre décret exécutif récent du président Biden ?

R : Non, dans la plupart des cas. L’ETS explique que :

En vertu du paragraphe (b)(2)(i), la présente ETS ne s’applique pas aux lieux de travail couverts par le Safer Federal Workforce Task Force COVID-19 Workplace Safety: Guidance for Federal Contractors and Subcontractors (voir Safer Federal Workforce Task Force, 24 septembre 2021). À quelques exceptions près, par exemple lorsqu’une contre-indication médicale, un handicap ou une conviction religieuse sincère empêcherait un employé de se conformer à certaines dispositions, ces directives exigent que les sous-traitants couverts s’assurent que tous les employés sous-traitants couverts (1) sont entièrement vaccinés avant le 8 décembre. 2021 ; (2) suivre les directives du CDC pour les masques et la distance physique, y compris les exigences de masquage et de distance en fonction du statut vaccinal de l’employé et du niveau de transmission communautaire du COVID-19 là où se trouve le lieu de travail ; et (3) désigner une personne pour coordonner les efforts de sécurité au travail liés à la COVID-19 sur les lieux de travail couverts. Étant donné que les employés des sous-traitants couverts sont déjà couverts par les protections de ces directives, l’OSHA a déterminé qu’il n’est pas nécessaire de se conformer à cette norme en plus des directives des sous-traitants fédéraux pour protéger les employés des sous-traitants couverts contre un grave danger posé par le COVID-19.

Q : Quand les employés sont-ils considérés comme entièrement vaccinés aux fins de l’ETS ?

R : En règle générale, deux semaines après avoir reçu la dose unique d’un vaccin COVID-19 à dose unique ou la deuxième dose d’un vaccin COVID-19 à deux doses. L’ETS note également que, pour qu’un employé soit considéré comme complètement vacciné, la deuxième dose de toute série de vaccins COVID-19 à deux doses doit être reçue par l’employé au moins 17 jours (21 jours avec un délai de grâce de quatre jours) après la première dose.

Q : Les employeurs peuvent-ils adopter des politiques qui dépassent les exigences minimales fixées par l’ETS ?

R : Oui.

Q : Quel est le délai de mise en conformité avec l’ETS ?

R : Les employeurs américains couverts par l’ETS doivent s’y conformer d’ici le 5 décembre 2021, sauf en ce qui concerne les exigences en matière de tests. La date limite pour se conformer aux exigences de test pour les employés qui ne sont pas complètement vaccinés est le 4 janvier 2022.

Q : Combien de temps l’ETS restera-t-il en vigueur ?

R : En vertu de la loi sur la sécurité et la santé au travail (loi SST), une ETS sert de proposition de norme permanente, et la loi exige que la norme permanente soit finalisée dans les six mois suivant la publication de l’ETS.

Contacts clés :

Mark S. Goldstein, Partner, New York – mgoldstein@reedsmith.com
Emily P. Harbison, Partner, Houston – eharbison@reedsmith.com
James A. Holt, Counsel, Pittsburgh – jholt@reedsmith.com
John McDonald, Partner, Princeton – jmcdonald@reedsmith.com
Benjamin H. Patton, Partner, Houston – bpatton@reedsmith.com